Asylum ~ Hottea

May 21, 2015 @ ThisIsColossal

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The private commission produced by K&CO and Pliskin Architecture is called Asylum, a title the artist chose “because the act of creating it pushed my mental and physical endurance so far that I wasn’t sure I could complete the task,” he shares with Brooklyn Street Art. For almost a century starting in 1839, the island was also home to the New York City Lunatic Asylum. The vibrantly luminous gradients that define the area around the pool contrast starkly when viewed against the rest of the surrounding landscape, creating a surprising oasis of color.

 

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Nudie Suits

May 14, 2015 @ DangerousMinds

Roswell-themed suit with UFOs made for Keith Richards

Roswell-themed suit with UFOs made for Keith Richards

These fashion masterpieces are all excess, sometimes with sexy images of naked ladies, pot leaves, pills and poppies, worn by everyone from Hank Williams to Keith Richards to Ronald Reagan.

Nudie’s beginnings were far humbler than the “country luxury” aesthetic he came to create. Born in 1902 in Ukraine, Nuta Kotlyarenko was so poor that he often had mismatched shoes collected from cast-offs (an indignity he later paid homage to by intentionally wearing mismatched boots—though generally of his own high-end custom design). After immigrating to America and changing his name at age 11, Cohn followed in his boot-maker father’s footsteps and apprenticed as a tailor. In 1940, he and his wife moved to LA and started Nudie’s Rodeo Tailors in their garage, quickly becoming the preferred couturier of the country music scene.
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EnChroma

March 4, 2015 @ Smithsonian

enchroma

The California company EnChroma is creating lenses that allow some to see colors for the first time.

The impact of EnChroma sunglasses: the left shows what a wearer with red-green colorblindness would typically see. The right shows what they see while wearing the sunglasses. (EnChroma)*

Pink Hens

March 28, 2015 @ LaughingSquid

pinkhens

Yesterday, two bright pink chickens were spotted wandering on the waterfront in Portland, Oregon. Workers at the animal shelter say that food coloring is often used to dye chicks, an effect that lasts until the animal’s first molting. The practice of dyeing the animals is physically harmless to chicks, but some animal welfare groups frown upon it as it may discourage pet owners from seeing dyed chickens at Easter as a pet that requires a home and care for years.

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Red Pistachios

February 3, 2015 @ HuffingtonPost

isolated pistachio nuts

What the hell happened to red pistachios? If you have no idea what red pistachios are, you’re probably under the age of 30. Once upon a time, however, pistachios used to be bright red — not a natural red, but a dyed red that left your hands (and potentially your face) a vivid hue of cherry. But they’re not around anymore. So what gives?

The disappearance of red-colored pistachios is a direct result of the exponential increase in homegrown pistachios and the limit on pistachio imports from the Middle East. When the U.S. was importing pistachios, the nut shells would often be splotchy in color, the Kitchn explains. The shells got stained from traditional harvesting methods in which the nuts weren’t immediately hulled and washed. Since the appearance of these stains was unappetizing, pistachio producers in the Middle East took to dying the shells bright red to hide the stains, Richard Matoian, Executive Director of the American Pistachio Growers told HuffPost Taste. A few American producers followed suit because the market was used to seeing pistachios with a bright red hue, Matoian said. But all that’s over now.

Read more at Huffington Post

Pigment Library

February 19, 2015 @ HyperAllergic

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When the Harvard Art Museums reopen this Sunday after a six-year expansion project, historic pigments foundational to the field of art conservation in the United States will be on public view. A new display will showcase the Forbes Pigment Collection as part of the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies.

Read more at Hyper Allergic