Blue Alchemy: Stories of Indigo ~ Mary Lance

May 21, 2015 @ Facebook & BlueAlchemyIndigo

bluealchemyindigoBLUE ALCHEMY: Stories of Indigo is a feature-length documentary about indigo, a blue
 dye that has captured the human imagination for millennia. It is also about people who are reviving indigo in projects that are intended to improve life in their communities, preserve cultural integrity, improve the environment, and bring beauty to the world. BLUE ALCHEMY was filmed in India, Japan, Bangladesh, Mexico, El Salvador, Nigeria, and the USA.


Find out more in the links above


Arresting the Albino Hunters

March 16, 2015 @ TheAtlantic

A woman holds her albino child before registering him at the office of the Tanzania Albino Society (TAS) in Dar Es Salaam.

A woman holds her albino child before registering him at the office of the Tanzania Albino Society (TAS) in Dar Es Salaam.

The Tanzanian police have arrested more than 200 unlicensed traditional healers linked to recent murders and kidnappings of the country’s albino population. The East African country banned witchdoctors in January, but the government is now using force to try to put an end to the grisly practice of albino hunting: At least 76 albinos have been murdered in Tanzania since 2000, while dozens have had limbs hacked off and survived.

Why Are Albinos Being Attacked?

Some Tanzanians believe that potions made from albino body parts have magical properties, bringing good luck or wealth to those who consume them. “When you bring [a witch doctor] a body part, such as an arm, a leg or a finger, the witch doctor will make a potion with it,” Issac Timothy, an albino activist from the town of Geita told NPR. “A miner will pour it in the ground where he wants to find minerals or a fisherman will pour it in his canoe.”

The Red Cross says witchdoctors are prepared to pay as much as $75,000 for a set of albino body parts, and the set of items found in the possession of the arrested witch doctors . . .

Read more at The Atlantic

Studio Laura Daza

May 11, 2015 @ LauraDazaStudio


Different colours, shades and tints have the power to evoke mood and emotion, but it seems that the origins and journeys of these pigments are often forgotten. Today, colour is a commodity industrially produced for mass consumption. However, there was a time when the story of origin was integral to colour identity, the narrative of provenance possessing a power and a sense of magic.

Colour Provenance is a visual investigation and interpretation into the ancient origins of colour pigment. Through developing a thorough understanding and knowledge of how colour was once sourced, crafted and utilized in the past, I hope to both celebrate the ancient rituals and alchemic techniques and encourage us to once again appreciate colour provenance.

It’s a true celebration of ancient rituals combined with pure alchemy, executed with genuine consideration for the materials and the importance they used to carry before our reliance on mass production.

Find out more at Laura Daza Studio

Colour Provenance – DIY Colour Recipe Book


Support her campaign here

Shooting Colors in the Philippines

February 2015 @ MoC

February 4, 2015 @ PhilippineTextileResearchInstitute

We spent few weeks in Manila this winter, immersing in the Filipino culture, shooting colors and hunting words for our ColorCorpus research. It was good fun and we’ll be back to visit the countryside at some point later. Enjoy!


The Philippine Textile Research Institute of the Department of Science and Technology (PTRI-DOST) has recently released its new publication, Bahaghari: Colors of the Philippines. The 140-page book contains general information on natural dyes and their plant sources and clear, crisp photos of PTRI-developed naturally dyed tropical fabrics in formal ensemble with a twist of elegance worn by participants and delegates to the 8th ASEAN Science and Technology Week (ASTW) in July 2008, Miss Earth 2007 candidates, and some ramp models. Besides the ASTW, the naturally dyed barongs and dresses jazzed up the Bahaghari Fashion Show at the ASTW dinner held at Hotel Sofitel Philippine Plaza, Manila and gave zest to the pictorial for the book.

Bahaghari: Colors of the Philippines attaches social connotations with each featured color from natural dyes and illustrates the facets of the Filipino culture. PTRI researchers Julius L. Leaño Jr. and Jenice P. Malabanan co-wrote the book.


Date : April 25
Venue : Pinamalayan, Oriental Mindoro
According to an old story, the early settlers of Pinamalayan came from Marinduque. While on their way to Mindoro using their boats, they encountered turbulent weather and lost their direction. They prayed to God Almighty for deliverance and guidance so the weather cleared and a rainbow appeared on the horizon. The crew shouted ipinamalay meaning “it was made known”. They followed the direction of the rainbow and landed at what is now Barangay Lumangbayan and established the first settlement which they named Pinamalayan. The rainbow became the historical landmark of the town. The yearly Bahaghari Festival is a colorful commemoration of the importance of the rainbow in the history of the town of Pinamalayan. The celebration includes a street dancing competition, cultural presentations, religious and cultural activities, products and trade fair. Like the rainbow which rises to give color in the sky after the torrent of rain, the Bahaghari Festival is a reflection of the continuing effort of the people of Pinalamayan that there is truly paradise at the end of the rainbow.

Contact : Office of the Mayor, Pinamalayan, Oriental Mindoro
Telephone No. (043) 284-3146 / 443-1486

Bluer than blue: the revival of Philippine indigo @ Fibre2Fashionindigo dyed pina-seda barong

Philippine indigo (Indigofera tinctoria) is one of the oldest dyes in civilization and one of the most widely used natural dyes in the whole world due to its excellent colorfastness properties. In the Philippines, indigo was once extensively used in the weaving industry including the abel of llocos and the Abrenian fabrics.

The Philippine indigo has been part of the Galleon and Chinese trade in northern Philippines, centuries ago; however, the successful production of cheaper synthetic indigo eased it out of the market and caused its rapid decline not only in the Philippines but also all over the world.

In the Philippines, the former First Lady Amelia “Ming” Ramos initiated the effort to revive indigo dyeing. She became the Patroness of natural dyes and spearheaded the Katutubong Kulay Project of the Katutubong Filipino Foundation in the early 1990’s. The transfer and commercialization of the Philippine Textile Research Institute (PTRI) developed technology on indigo in Abra revived and upgraded the age long tradition of using tayum, the local name of indigo in Abra. In fact, a town in Abra was aptly named Tayum, reportedly because of the abundance of naturally growing indigo in the place. Tayum is where Abra’s Natural Dye Center is located.

Read more at Fibre2Fashion

Ang Alamat ng Bahaghari (The Legend of the Rainbow) @ Behance


Colors Gambia Bumsters Wear

August 30, 2014 @ TravelNinemsn

Bumsters [Gambia]
“Easily recognisable, bumsters sport brightly coloured vests, T-shirts or the Rasta colours of green, yellow and red. Stationed outside hotels and on the beaches, the gaudy studs get their share of takers.”


PS. The article doesn’t come with a date, but looks like it’s 2009/2010, so they might be wearing different colors now –or not.